Playing Catch Up – News and Important Dates

With Corgi Tru. She was the canine love of my life.

I haven’t posted anything on the blog since May of this year, after being reasonably consistent about popping something new up for you at least a couple of times a month.  May was around the time small and a few big things started to go wrong around here, starting with my Corgi Tru being diagnosed with terminal liver disease and cancer.  Tru was my steadfast companion for the past eleven years and the dog our four sons were raised with.  To watch her sicken, with one capability after another taken from her by the cancer, was both heartbreaking and demoralizing.  On June 13th, it was clear that prolonging her life was not in her best interest, and I had promised, from the day she arrived to our home, that she would know nothing but love and care for all of her days.  Our amazing friend and veterinarian came over that evening, and Tru passed away very peacefully outside on the grass with many of her loved ones holding and surrounding her.  I didn’t really get off the sofa for about three days – not for any length of time anyway – and from there it’s been a summer of more minor mishaps, from the annoying to the comical.  I will spare you most of those, but if you’ve been following the Facebook page you know that it’s included one of my bee hives swarming, having a lot of my inventory damaged in a microburst at a show in Portland, and then coming home that same night to find my favorite witness-tree birch on fire from a lightning strike, necessitating its felling.  A friend of mine said, “Girlfriend, burn some sage at your house!”

I feel like I’m starting to recover now.  Things are going a bit better and my spirits are always lifted as fall approaches.  It’s my favorite season here in Maine by far.  For a variety of reasons, summer is my least favorite season, plus, for me, fall is like my new year.  Instead of spring, or January, my new beginnings often happen in the fall.   This year especially, I am feeling the need to get back to learning, growing, changing, and moving forward.

So, let’s do a little catching up first.

Tovookan’s Honey

One good thing that happened this summer was that we bottled our first batch of Tovookan’s honey from the Parris House beehives.  We had about sixty pounds altogether and while I have sold quite a lot of it, I do still have some jars left.  If anyone is interested in a one pound jar, they are $10 and available at the Maine studio, OR they can be shipped.  Be aware, however, that shipping is running around $7 – $9, so I leave it to your discretion as to whether or not you’d like a jar from a distance.

I have also had the privilege of working with three publishers who I have long admired.  Down East Magazine currently has some of my rug hooking kits and finished pillows in their Summer Pop Up Shop at their headquarters in Rockport, Maine.  If you are traveling along the beautiful Maine Midcoast for the remainder of this summer and in to September, please stop in to the shop right on Route 1 to peruse not only my things, but a great selection of Maine Made products.

The holiday issue of Rug Hooking Magazine will also feature my pattern and project article as the centerfold pull out.  I remember when I first started hooking thinking it was a really big deal to have that role in an RHM issue, and now here I am.  As always, linen patterns and kits will be available for purchase through RHM when the magazine comes out.

Finally, I have a really lovely and fun project coming out in the fall issue of Making Magazine, assembled and edited by the talented and hard working Carrie Hoge, a fellow Mainer.  I don’t want to put any spoilers here, but the theme of the magazine this fall is “Lines” and my project was designed accordingly.  I loved making it and loved working the Carrie, whose outstanding photography truly captures the beauty of any project she’s shooting.

My work is also on display in the Maine Made kiosk at Bangor International Airport.  It’s so fun to know that busy travelers going in and out of the airport can take a moment to see my bee pillow in the kiosk.  It’s my hope that it brightens someone’s day.

I also just launched two new hooked pillows for Beekman 1802, a bee and a pink pig, continuing with the theme of animals you might find on the farm.   My Instagram post of the bee is the most liked post ever in the history of my IG account, so I’m expecting it to do well in the Mercantile.  It was also “liked” by one of my hooking heroines, who I will not name here.  🙂

So, let’s look forward to what’s coming up the last few weeks of the summer and in to the fall…

Project for The Stitchery

I have a beginner rug hooking class coming up at The Stitchery in Portsmouth, RI, this Sunday, August 27th that you can still sign up for!  We will be doing a double heart scented buckwheat pillow; this is the prototype, to the left.  For more information and to sign up, click HERE.

On September 2nd we will have another of our SUPER FUN beginner dye classes here at the Parris House.  To sign up, click HERE. 

Once again, I will be participating in the Sharon Springs Harvest Festival on September 9th and 10th in beautiful Sharon Springs, NY!  I will not be down in the vendor area this year, but rather I will be at Beekman Farm demonstrating and teaching rug hooking for our Beekman Neighbors who come to the farm tours.  I hope to have some of my exclusive-to-Beekman 1802 pillows for sale in the Mercantile, however, for any neighbors who want to shop for them on the spot at Harvest Festival. Normally they are made to order and purchased online with a 2 week completion time.

I will also be having a beginner class at Scarborough Adult Ed (Maine) starting at the end of September.  Follow the website and FB page for more information on that as it becomes available.  We will be doing Maine forest/camp themed projects, so this is not to be missed!

Learn to make soap with us!

On October 7th, we will have a soap making class again here at the Parris House.  To sign up for that, click HERE. 

The Hampden Hook-In, sponsored by The Keeping Room, will take place on October 21st this year and I will be there again vending.  Hope to see many of you there!

Last, but not least, for events, the Fifth Annual Paris Hill Hook In is set to take place on Saturday, November 4th.  If you have not signed up already, please do soon.  I have reduced the number of participants this year to fifty.  That’s a reduction of about a dozen spots because I am hearing so very many complaints at hook-ins about inadequate space.  If the majority of hookers feel that more space is needed at these events but still want to enjoy the more down-home and charming venues, then the sacrifice has to be made in the number of attendees.  Therefore, I only have a limited number of spaces left.  For all of the information on this event, click HERE.

Some of the garden harvest so far.

The Parris House gardens were not their best this season.  In speaking to a friend of mine who is literally a professional farmer about how relatively poorly I think my tomatoes are doing, she said right away that the nights have been too cold and the days of high heat too few.  I will say, though, that the Parris House apple trees are absolutely loaded, so let’s keep our fingers crossed for those!

And so we move forward.  Not every year is our best year, but in looking back over just what I’ve written here, I realize that some very good things have happened.  And just about two weeks ago, one other very good thing happened…

Meet Wyeth, our new five month old Rough Collie.  (Yes, he’s named for NC, Andrew, and Jamie Wyeth – I’m an art geek.)  My husband grew up with Collies and loves them, and since we have had the good fortune to live with my favorite breed for the past eleven years, I thought it was his turn to live with his.  Wyeth was born in Georgia right around the time his breeder family (Morris Oaks Farm) was making a move to Maine, and that’s why he came to us so relatively late for a puppy.  But this is perfect for me as he is already so well trained and socialized and best of all, housebroken!  He already loves the attention of our Tuesday group hookers, although I do my best to keep him both out of their hooking bags and away from their lunches.  Dog lovers everywhere will know the complexity of my feelings as I fall in love with this new puppy.  I still shed tears for Tru, and at the same time find joy in getting to know Wyeth.

I will be getting back on the regular-blogging wagon.  Tell me in the comment thread any topics you would like to see covered on the blog (can be fiber art, travel, gardening, beekeeping, whatever!), and if I choose yours I will give you an online or in person coupon for $5 off any purchase of $25 or more.   Also, don’t forget to sign up for our newsletter, which I will also be getting back to, by using the sign up box at the bottom of the web page.

Happy hooking and thanks for reading!

 

 

 

Why We Hook the Animals We Love

This is my Welsh Corgi, Tru.  (If you really want to get to know her, she has her own Facebook page here.)  As you can see, she was sunbathing this morning while I was putting the finishing touches on the first pattern for the Parris House Hookers’ Circle subscription service, shipping this week.   As I posted on our Facebook page this morning, I am painfully aware that Tru is now about twelve years old, and that most of my time with her is behind us.   I never thought I could love a dog this fiercely until she came in to our lives, but here I am, pondering a post-Tru world even though as of right now, she is still happy, active, and healthy.

For this reason, I have been thinking lately that I need to gather up all the photos I have of her (there are many!), and also sit quietly with her, make a sketch of her sweet face, and hook it.    Now, I have never hooked an animal in a detailed way, the way I want to hook Tru’s image.   I want to capture the glint in her eye that still exists even though I see the encroaching cloudiness of cataracts.  I want to hook the pretty combination of “red” and white and maybe now a little gray that defines her face.  I want to add the teeny tiny white eyelashes and delicate fur in her ears.  I think this project is going to have to be refined and textural and multimedia, but since I can see it, I know I can make it a reality.

Prior to this I have not hooked many animals.  One of the most popular patterns in the shop is “Tesla’s First Snow,” which, rather than a late-in-life portrait, is a depiction of our big orange tabby, Tesla, as a four month old kitten seeing his first snowfall out the window.  After being initially perplexed, he wanted to “catch” the snowflakes as they cascaded down.   I snapped a picture of the scene and the result was this:

As you can see, this is a very primitive rendering of Tesla.  His back is turned to us so that, frankly, I didn’t need to deal with the detail of his face, although that is still true to the photograph.  This was done in 2012.  I learned to hook in 2011.  I was simply not ready to take on the complexities of Tesla’s face!   (In case anyone is wondering, he is named for Nikola Tesla, the scientist/inventor.  This happens when you have four sons who dig science.)

I also hook animals for Beekman 1802, and it is absolutely true that I love these animals I’m depicting.   I actually met Polka Spot back in 2014 on the day Jen and I first presented our work to Josh and Brent.  They kindly sent us on a farm tour with Megan, who was then their artisan coordinator, and we were thrilled to see the baby goats, Bubby the cat, Onder the dog, and, as they say, “every living thing at Beekman farm.”   Bubby passed away since then, and Polka has also “gone to Paris,” but both of them had distinct personalities.  Polka was one of the most regal animals I’ve ever encountered, and it was clear that she took her watch over the goats seriously.  Bubby was just one giant furball of love, demanding our attention while Onder ran in and out of the barn playfully.  Here is the menagerie I hook for Beekman 1802.

Last year I had a major commission for a customer’s beloved Pharaoh Hound.  The story on that is here, and the result is below.

Why are we willing to put so much time and effort in to these portraits of our favorite pets or animals?  Or, if we aren’t artisans ourselves, willing to commission someone else to create them?   I think it’s about the innocence, unconditional love, and nobility of character we so often find in our pets.  I don’t say that to anthropomorphize animals.  As my biologist/ecologist son, James, likes to remind me, “They don’t think the way we do.”   And, of course, he’s right.  They don’t think the way we do.   In fact, it’s impossible for us, really, to get inside their heads.  They are coming from an entirely different reality, biology, instinct than we are.  And yet…it is so easy to make important connections with them, and they with us.  We want to immortalize them in art because we know – we are so painfully aware – that their lifespans are much shorter than we’d like and that our own lives are so much better with them by our sides.

Sometimes they’re exasperating.  Tesla wants to kill my knitting if I don’t put it up and out of the way.  Tru wants to be directly under my feet if I’m preparing chicken for dinner.   Tesla is incapable of having a hairball in any location except on a carpet.  Tru occasionally gets so excited over visitors she pees at their feet.  Yeah.   And the fur.  It’s everywhere.  No vacuum on this planet is its equal.

Yesterday, my oldest son, Robert, shared this picture of his and his girlfriend’s, Tracy’s, cats peering out their apartment window in much the same way Tesla peered out at his first snow about five or six years ago.   They are Valentine and Playdough, respectively, and both are well under a year old.   Just the beginning of another generation’s connection with animals.

I hope you will share pictures of your animals and also pictures of artwork you’ve done inspired by them.  Feel free to tell their stories and what they mean to you.  I look forward to learning all about them.

Happy hooking! – Beth

Tesla one-upping Tru and snagging the sunny spot.

 

We’re Gonna Let Love Rule…and Other News

 

Since I’m going to be blogging at least once a week, you’re going to learn random facts about me.   Here’s one now:  I’m a major Lenny Kravitz fan.  I fell hard for Lenny Kravitz’s music in 1999 not long after “Fly Away” came out.  At that time in my life my husband and I were figuring out how to make a major life change by leaving urban/suburban NJ to start a new life for ourselves and our four young sons in rural Maine.   “Fly Away” was on the radio all the time back then.  I’d hear it at home, at the gym, in the supermarket, and it kind of became my anthem for leaving a life that wasn’t right for me or for my young family.  It’s still near the top of my list of favorite songs in that genre.

After “Fly Away,” I think the song that comes back to me most from Kravitz’s catalog is “Let Love Rule.”  It seems particularly appropriate as we go in to the Valentine’s Day holiday in a few weeks to take apart that title:  “Let Love Rule.”  What does that mean?  Is that some kind of hippy dippy nonsense completely impossible in the modern world, and in a nation that’s more stressed than I ever recall in my lifetime?  (I’m 51, for the record.)

I’m not going to expound too much here.  Were this my personal blog, I might, but at the same time, I don’t think I need to.  I did write on this topic a little more extensively almost a year ago and you can read that here.  We all know what it means, though.  “Let Love Rule” means that every decision we make, every word we say, every action we take, every position we support, has to be run through that filter, that criteria.  Is what I’m about to decide, say, do, letting love rule?  Or is something else at work here?  I fail at this on a regular basis, but maybe just this month, as a celebration of Valentine’s Day, I’ll give it an especially conscious try.  That’s my intention for the month, anyway.  Feel free to share your thoughts on the subject in the comment thread.

All right.  On to the other news…

Have you hooked anything for Valentine’s Day?  It’s not too late, and our shop is filled with hearts of one kind of another.   Some are patterns, all can be kitted, some are pillows, some are sachets.  Some are even finished – no hooking necessary – just have me ship it to you in time for Valentine’s Day.   Take a peek at the shop, navigating using the section clicks on the left sidebar, HERE.

Not specifically related to Valentine’s Day, but new to the shop this past week is a new digital download section for patterns.  I’ve been asked to provide this for a long time and you can see the first seven of them HERE.  They are designed for you to download, print in sections, put together, and transfer on to your own foundation.  They come with a full instruction sheet on how to properly draw a pattern on the grain with helpful hints for making the process as easy as possible.  An example is below.  In this case, “Tesla’s First Snow” will download in four sheets so that the pattern is actual size upon assembly.

 

Finally, this week I’m going to be introducing all of the particulars and sign up instructions for our new pattern/kit subscription service.  Last year I did an online survey and those of you who responded told me that a quarterly service would most interest you, with a mix of genres (seasonal, primitive, contemporary, etc).  You were pretty evenly split on patterns vs. kits, so I’m going to offer an option for each.   These will ship in March, June, September, and December of this year.  We’ll evaluate the program at the end of the year for popularity, participation, and any tweaking it needs in response to your feedback.   Patterns available through the subscription service will *only* be available to subscribers – not to any other customers – in the year they are shipped.

For those of you who have read the blog all the way to this point, here’s a special coupon code good through Valentine’s Day in the Etsy shop:  LETLOVERULE2017.   Use this coupon code for 10% off on any purchase of $25 or more in the Etsy shop.  I’ve just noticed that I’ve listed my 200th item in the shop, so hopefully you’ll find something  just right for you.

Happy hooking and let love rule.

 

 

Maine Craft Weekend & Registration for the 2016 Paris Hill Hook In Happening Now!

exterior1 The Fourth Annual Paris Hill Hook In is not yet filled!  Join us on November 5th for a hook in that past participants describe as one of the best (and sometimes they say “the best) hook ins they have ever attended.  I chalk this up to our warm, welcoming, and historic venue, our amazing locally catered fresh food, and, of course, the good company of over 60 hookers coming together for a wonderful fall day.  We also have an informal rug show, the ringing (by you!) of the historic Revere Foundry church bell, and this year only we will pull the winning ticket for our Maine Medical Center raffle rug.  Don’t have a ticket for that yet?  No problem.  You can buy them now by clicking here or you can even buy them in person the morning of the hook in.  Once again we will be welcoming Kim Dubay of Primitive Pastimes and Cherylyn Brubaker of Hooked Treasures as our vendors, along with, of course, Parris House Wool Works.  There will be door prizes as well (it’s not a hook in without door prizes).

You can get a hook in registration form HERE, but there’s a doubly fun way to sign up.  You can join us this coming weekend for Maine Craft Weekend!  We will be participating by having the Maine studio open both days, Saturday and Sunday, October 1st and 2nd, from 10 AM to 4 PM.  Here is what you can expect:  Parris House Wool Works is located in the beautiful Paris Hill National Historic District of the Western Lakes & Mountains Region of Maine. You can find us at the 200 year old historic Parris House at 546 Paris Hill Road, Paris and we will be open both days to introduce you to the heritage craft of North American wool-on-linen rug hooking! Join us for refreshments, demonstrations, lessons in rug hooking, and a studio filled with everything you need for the craft, including hooks, frames, original patterns, and wool, as well as assorted finished decor pieces to purchase. You will also be able to buy a raffle chance on a 3’x5′ hooked rug to benefit the Maine Medical Center Kidney Transplant Program; drawing November 5th. Feel free to walk the historic village while you’re here! Walking tour maps will be available.  

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We have recently added a variety of classes and events to our new calendar, and you may notice that the website is completely, beautifully re-imagined.  This creative work was done by Jacks McNamara of Root & Blossom Design.   Her services were extremely professional, but also warmly collaborative so that the site ended up looking like Parris House Wool Works, not a cookie cutter version of other sites.  I highly recommend her!

So, hopefully you will join us for Maine Craft Weekend, the Paris Hill Hook In, or any of the other fun classes and events we have scheduled for the fall and beginning of winter.

Happy hooking, and see you soon! – Beth

And the Universe Said, “Yes.” – Squam Art Workshops, Spring 2015

Chalkboard1

I am rarely at a loss for words.  I’m an avid writer of blog posts, and an even more able chatterer (unless the context is public speaking…then all bets are off).  Words are my thing.  I usually choose them carefully and aim them true, but here I sit finding it difficult to find the right ones to convey everything I experienced at the Squam Art Workshops last week.  The last time I was this verbally lost over an experience I had taken my oldest son and fellow Thoreauvian, then 17, to Walden Pond. The blog post that followed that trip was called, “Speechless…for a change.”

For months prior to teaching at Squam I had been contemplating what my proper direction in this craft really should be.  Like all big decisions, the answer was right there all along.  You know how this feels.  The answers are located right in the center of your being, it feels almost like they’re sitting at the center of your body, and therefore the old turn of phrase “gut feeling” applies.  We treat these gut feelings like heartburn or hangovers.  We ignore them when we’re very busy doing whatever it is we think we should be, or when they don’t seem convenient.

But at Squam, you’re living in that space where the answers are, and the pressing and influencing expectations of others, or even of yourself, fall away.  You are encouraged to be in the present moment, to be attentive to process, not product, and to shelve your preconceptions and let the retreat unfold for you as it will.  As it is said at Squam, this is where the magic happens.

DreamCatcher
The lacy dreamy dreamcatcher at the Squam Art Workshops. We were encouraged to write our dreams on a feather and pin them to the bottom. I actually pinned the dream of a dear friend on to this, because at Squam, you feel as though all of your own have come true.

Squam feels magical, but I would be remiss if I did not say this:  the magic is made in part by the vision and hard work of Director Elizabeth Duvivier, her assistant Forrest Elliott, and every single person who helps her, including the staff at Rockywold Deephaven Camps on Squam Lake.  While I am a true believer in the manifestation of dreams, I believe equally that none of that manifestation takes place without the hard work behind the dream.  Elizabeth and everyone involved do that hard and heartfelt work, and to them I am so grateful.

Of course, I went to Squam to teach rug hooking at the beginner level.  I owe this to Elizabeth’s generosity in inviting me, on taking a chance on someone and something completely new to Squam, because my friend, poet Sarah Sousa, called my work to her attention last year.  As I was explaining to my own teacher and mentor yesterday, I learned so much from my students that I am still processing it all.  At Squam, students are uncommonly open, adventurous, and filled with energy.  They are also collaborative and incredibly kind.  I’m not sure there is another teaching experience quite like this.   There are those that are as good, but Squam brings together artists and artisans with a unique kind of creativity and camaraderie, and to teach them is really an honor.   I hope I lived up to it.

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Zodiac, the home to our class, Modern Heirloom, at Squam.
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I brought a little wool for my students…

I want to apologize for not getting pics of my first of two classes.  To my students in that first class, you are every bit as dear to me as those in the second!  I was simply very focused on running that first class for the first time and did not break out the camera.

Here are my amazing and beautiful students from the second session.  Every student I had, from both classes, picked up this craft in a heartbeat and immediately started making it her own.  Some had stories to tell of how their fore mothers had practiced rug hooking, and of the hooked pieces that had been handed down.  Since part of our mission is to keep this heritage craft alive and thriving in to the next centuries, it was so rewarding to see the enthusiasm and creativity at work in these wonderful women.

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We hooked inside…
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We hooked outside…
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The variety of interpretations of the pattern was really fun to see.
ModernHeirloom
This was the prototype design, but every student created something very unique to her own aesthetic and style.

Why did I choose a dock and dragonfly for the prototype design?  Well, this is Squam lake, our venue…

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LakeCollage2

Having grown up summering on Little Sebago Lake in Gray, Maine (see a previous post on this here), I really feel at home and in my element in this kind of environment.  It centers me in a way no other space can, and this contributed to the magic I felt at Squam.

Also contributing to the magic?  Great lodging and great food.  I shared our cottage, aptly named “Bungalow,” with Sarah Sousa.  We had a great time catching up, having not seen one another in person in almost two years.

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The food was amazing. Whatever your dietary choices or restrictions are, you are well taken care of.

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And then, of course, there was yarn bombing.  Lots and lots of yarn bombing.

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And the chalkboards…every day at the dining hall…

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The Squam Art Fair and Ravelry Revelry, held on the last evening of the retreat, is a hand made paradise.  The amount of talent and creativity in that one room is humbling.  It is open to the public, and I highly recommend you visit it – and shop! – whenever it is held.  I did not get many pictures of the fair because I was a participant with a table, however, there are many pics out there on the net.

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I went to Squam not knowing exactly what to expect.  I was a bit nervous about teaching for the first time there.  Would I be good enough?  Would my class be engaging enough?  After all, this was a very accomplished group of students who had already worked with some very well known teachers.  Would I be enough?  What I discovered was two-fold.  On the one hand, I was enough.  I received the sweetest feedback on my class from my students, and I want to reach through the screen and hug every one of you.  On the other hand, I have so much to learn and so many directions in which to grow.  I was enough, but I can be so much more.  This is one of the primary lessons of Squam.  We are enough.  Right here and right now, in this moment, we are enough.  And yet, we are filled with potential at every point in our lives to do more and be more and catch our dearest dreams.

In the midst of these lessons, I gained clarity.  Questions offered up for weeks and months were answered resoundingly in the affirmative, and that’s a gift.   I do not believe my experience is unique.  I think this was happening all around me, in the lives of my fellow “Squammies.”   If we give ourselves the space and the freedom, the answers come.

The little fairy village below was on the wooded path between the dining hall and my classroom.  Literally and figuratively, love and spirit can be found along the paths at Squam.   Hope to see you there next year.  In the meantime, happy living and happy hooking.  – Beth

FairyVillage

On Goats and Gumption

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I’ve had two recurring themes on the brain this week:  goats and, for lack of a better term, gumption.  Gumption is one of those funny sounding English words that leaves you wondering who first came up with it.  It is described by Merriam Webster as:

1 –  chiefly dialect:  common sense, horse sense

2  – enterprise, initiative

Sometimes events just bring us recurring themes.  For example, that beautiful Ball jar of milk in the top picture is not from a cow.  Nope.  That milk, with the delicious cream on top, is from the goats of a new student and member of our Tuesday group, Terry E., who generously brought it to hooking along with some fantabulous homemade goat milk mozzarella.  The Saturday before, during her hooking lesson, Terry and I had talked about goats and their indefatigable ways.  Terry has way more one on one time with goats than I do, but I’ve spent a little time with them as well.

One thing I know about goats is that they are born with that bouncy, LOOK AT MEEE, nothing is impossible nature.   When Jen and I went out to Sharon Springs, NY a little over a year ago to present our hooked wares to Beekman 1802 (something that in itself took all the gumption we could muster), Josh and Brent were incredibly kind to send us with their right hand woman, Megan, to see Farmer John’s new baby goats at the Beekman farm.  The instant we walked in to the barn the babies were clamoring to see who was there, what was going on, and how they could be part of the action.  They were so sweet, so affectionate, and so off the charts charming that Jen and I left there vowing to have goats some day.  Will this ever happen?  I can’t speak for Jen, but as the empty nest imminently approaches for me, I’m thinking that after 25 years of raising kids, I may not want to dive in to raising “kids.”  Terry’s goat milk is great.  I may not need to add goats to the big flock of chickens already living in my barn.

I’ve been hooking a lot of goats since we joined the Beekman 1802 Rural Artist Collective.  I’ve been hooking Faintly, a goat born on the Beekman Farm several years ago…

Faintly

And I’ve been hooking Baby Goat (in fact, I shipped another one today), because well, it’s spring and baby goats happen…

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And I’ve been hooking Grown Up Goat, because you’ve got to have those to make baby goats, right?

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We even have a goat design in our Etsy shop, independent of Beekman 1802, called Goat Go Round.

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We clearly have a thing for goats.

But where does gumption come in?

Well, goats have gumption.  Try telling a goat it can’t do something or go somewhere.  Try telling a goat not to love on you while you’re trying to get something else done in its presence.  Try telling a goat not to eat something…you know, anything not nailed down and sometimes things that are nailed down.

That’s gumption.

I’ve been seeing a lot of gumption this week, along with all things goat.  The aforementioned Terry, as a new student, is tackling one of our most challenging designs, A Murder Among the Magnolias.  When she left here on Tuesday she had the first crow finished absolutely beautifully.  If you aren’t familiar with this pattern, this is Jen’s completed version of it:

I’ve also been part of a business coaching group on Facebook listening to the stories of other fledgling women entrepreneurs as they navigate their way to their true callings, and sharing our own.  Inspiring and loaded with gumption.

An artist friend of mine told me this afternoon about how gumption and listening to his inner voice landed him a significant sale, but then this man’s entire existence is about gumption…and faith.

And then the newest issue of Rug Hooking Magazine landed in my mailbox.  There’s an article in there for hookers who want to design their own patterns, but believe they can not draw.  The article promotes using stencils to create rug designs for the drawing challenged, and I confess, this is not a bad idea.  Stencils are fun and easy and produce pretty rugs, especially when combined in interesting and unique ways.  But…I never accept it when a student tells me she can’t draw.  I just don’t.  Stencils may be a good confidence builder and learning tool, but at some point you’ve got to just fearlessly grab an art pencil, a LARGE eraser (I’ve got a big eraser here and I’m not afraid to use it!), a metric ton of gumption, and start drawing.  Yes, yes, you can.

Recently Jen got up the gumption to start sketching out her own patterns.  Heretofore she had successfully partnered with our go-to realistic style artist, Dan Rosenburg (who is still doing custom patterns for the Maine hookers when I know the style requested is more his than mine), and together they created some absolute marvels, including A Murder Among the Magnolias, 1796 House, Southern Elegy, Victorian Rose & Bluebird, and our WWII and Atomic Age patterns.  (To see all of our patterns, please go to our shop section, “Patterns.”) What she is coming up with all on her own now is absolutely fabulous, and I can’t wait until we can get them up in the shop for all of you to see, and to hook.  You will not be disappointed.  Rather, you will be enchanted.

One of the questions in the business coaching group I’m part of this week was, “What fear or limiting belief is holding you back from something you really want to do?”  Or, in the context of this blog post, “Where do you need to apply gumption and simply do whatever it is you really want?”

Maybe you really believe you can’t draw and therefore can’t create a pattern that’s really, really you.

Maybe you think you can’t hook in 3s and 4s or do fine shading.  Or conversely, maybe you think you can’t hook primitive.

Maybe you think you can’t break out of a style box you’ve been in for a lot of years now. (If this is the case, see the inspiring articles in this issue of Rug Hooking Magazine on steampunk, portraiture in bright colors, and more.)

Maybe you think you can’t make a career or business out of something that’s an absolute passion for you.

Maybe you think no one would be interested in your craft if you set out to teach it, or maybe you think you don’t know enough to teach it.  Try it out on an 8 year old.  Having taught a few children now, I can assure you that there’s a future for this craft if we all apply gumption and spread it around.

Two weeks from today I will teach my first class at the Squam Art Workshops.  Am I nervous?  Absolutely.  But I have the love of our craft to steady me.  The attendees this year were so very interested in rug hooking that my class was one of the first to sell out.  That’s not about me; they don’t know me yet.  That’s about our craft, this craft which was born of gumption (remember? enterprise, initiative, horse sense?) as a way to decorate and cover cold New England and Canadian Maritime floors.  Our foremothers and forefathers in the craft used what they had, which turned out to be burlap sacks, repurposed wool clothing, and lots and lots of gumption, to start a heritage we still enjoy today every time we pick up our hooks.

And, I’ll bet they had a goat, or two, or ten.

Let’s be like them, and like their goats!  Let’s apply our gumption to our craft and to our lives.  Let’s try new things, believe in ourselves, and make beautiful rugs along the way.

Happy goats, happy gumption, and happy hooking!  – Beth

“New” Room at the Parris House – Take a Peek!

As many of our Facebook followers know, we’ve been working on redecorating the south parlor at the Parris House, which is a classic twin parlor Federal.  Just a couple of weeks ago our Tuesday group was overflowing the north parlor aka the hooking studio.  At the time the “new” parlor was still in disarray during the painting and decluttering process.  Next time we have more hookers than seats, we’ll have the option of flowing over in to this new room.

In my quest to take the house toward ruthless simplicity, the room is spartan, although I am still looking for just the right rug (the rug maker has no rug…) and a small coffee table.   At this juncture, an object needs to be useful, be beautiful, or have a significant piece of my heart to stay in the house.

Here are some pics with captions…

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We went with a bright sunny blue, “Emily” by California Paints. If you have not used California Paints in a while, I urge you to give them another try. The new-ish primer included formulation truly gives nearly one coat coverage. I always do two, but it was barely necessary. This blue went on over a tough-to-cover primitive mustard yellow and barely needed the second coat. The whole room was done with a single gallon.
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We covered the old taupe love seat with a new cover. This room redo was done on a shoestring. There was not going to be money for a lot of new furniture. #educatingkidsemptypockets
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This locally made step back cabinet had been painted a primitive cream with distressed corners. I’m honestly all primitived out at this juncture in my life and am looking for a brighter, cleaner look for the house. I painted this in California’s basic white. I still need to put the second coat on and put the knobs back on. I wanted a place to display our heritage family photos.  Portrait of Corgi Tru by Rockland, Maine artist Mae Towers.
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This is the built in book case next to the fireplace. I wanted to be able to put a lot of our antique books in a single area. The vintage teddy bear belonged to my beloved brother, who left this world at age 31 in 1986. It is one of my most treasured possessions. The smaller teddy bear buddy is a reproduction given me by a dear friend.
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The Empire sofa was an eBay find. We went down to Rhode Island a few weeks ago to pick it up. Its scale shows us that people were a lot smaller back in the day, but I find it very comfortable. It makes you sit up straight and is perfect for reading, knitting, and…of course!…hooking. The table to the right of it is actually a 1929 Atwater Kent tube radio. Yes, it works!
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OK, so I can’t part with the Corgi pillow. The Eastlake style Victorian chair was a find from a neighbor’s yard sale. It needs new upholstery. The map over the fireplace is an 1880 map of Paris Hill and Paris, Maine.
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Writing nook. I need to find a way to get power to this corner for my laptop. It *is* the 21st century after all.  The sewing table was made in Paris, Maine by Paris Manufacturing Company.  The watercolor over the desk was done by long time family friend Joan Kell and is of Owl’s Head, Maine.  The lighthouse pen and ink was done by my son, James.  <3
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View coming in from the kitchen (which has also just been painted and decluttered, but that’s another post). Writing nook to left.

Thanks for cyber visiting the Parris House and we hope you’ll stop by in person some day!  Happy hooking.  🙂   – Beth

Three New Buckwheat Warming Pillows in the Beekman 1802 Mercantile!

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Jen and I have been busy making new things for the Beekman 1802 Mercantile.  Some of them just went up, and some are for the future (you’ll just have to wait…).  You can click on the hyperlinks below to see them in the Mercantile.

A word about buckwheat pillows…

We infuse buckwheat seeds with essential oils to make lovely and soothing scents.  These go in to the pillows which are then microwavable for warmth, or freezable for coolness, useful for muscle aches, headaches, or simply just for relaxation.  We encourage you to give them a try.  They’re pretty too!

This is Jen’s Lavender Jasmine Buckwheat warming pillow.   It’s inspired by the laying hens at the Beekman farm, with the 1802 logo numbers on the front.

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Also Jen’s, this is her Orange Cinnamon Buckwheat warming pillow.  This is a modern take on the classic vintage kitchen towels of the 1930s and 40s.  Jen is working on a red one as well.

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This is Beth’s Baby Goat Lavender Buckwheat pillow, inspired by Farmer John’s playful baby goats.

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While you are looking at our pillows, check out the rest of the beautiful offerings at Beekman 1802.  Josh and Brent carefully curate the Beekman 1802 Rural Artist Collective to bring you the best of American craft.  We’ve said it before but we are so very happy to be part of Beekman 1802 and this initiative to promote and preserve American hand work.

Happy hooking, and happy shopping!  – Beth

Maine Maple Sunday 2015 in Minot, Maine

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Today was Maine Maple Sunday in Maine!  On this day the sugar houses generously open their doors to visitors, often providing pancake breakfasts, ice cream, and an astonishing variety of yummy maple treats.  Normally on Maine Maple Sunday, we visit a variety of nearby sugar houses, but because I was spending half of the day doing the craft fair at the West Minot Grange, I only visited one.  But what a GOOD one!

First, though, about the craft fair…

Old Grange halls are an endangered species.  I moved to Maine fifteen years ago from Pennington, NJ, the formerly rural and agricultural town where my husband grew up.  I well remember my heartbreak when the Pennington Grange was torn down to make way for a modern (and completely excessive) town hall.  It was one of many disappointments that solidified our determination to raise our four sons in an area where agriculture and heritage were held more dear.   I can not say that the old Grange tradition is completely safe in Maine either nowadays, but we do have some beautiful old examples.  One of these is the West Minot Grange.

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Here is a little history of this Grange from the Minot town website:  “West Minot Grange #42 was organized in 1874; the petition to form was signed on Calvin Bucknam’s tall silk hat. This Grange also operated a grange Store at one time. Today this Grange is very active and has allowed the Minot Historical Society, which formed in 2001, to use a room in their building for storage.”

This gorgeous old building was the site of today’s craft fair.  I was invited to participate by the uber talented Pat Hutter, who also makes our “Wool Collector” signs as well as wooden signs for Sturbridge Yankee Workshop.  I had a great time and have to give a huge thank you to Pat for organizing a very successful and fun event.

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Pat’s lovely array of signs can be seen in the far right corner. My table is in the left foreground. The rest of the space was filled with wonderful crafters and product representatives as well.
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My table set up the afternoon prior.

Of course, one of the reasons we had so many wonderful visitors to the craft fair was because downstairs on the main level of the Grange, Slattery’s Farm and Maple Supply Company was putting on a fantabulous pancake breakfast.  I have to tell you, I love Slattery’s.  If there is anything at all you need for maple syruping, home canning, gardening, livestock, or just surviving Maine winters, Slattery’s has it.  They also produce many crops all summer long and sell beautiful produce from the store.  Here are some pics of the Grange I took the afternoon before as it was all set up for the breakfast.  I do not have pics of the breakfast because I was upstairs meeting and greeting!

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After the craft show was over and I packed up my things, it was time to go over to the nearby West Minot Sugar House, also owned by the Slattery family.  This is a truly wonderful sugar house.  They were also serving meals over there (breakfast AND lunch), along with ice cream with maple syrup.

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I have to agree.

When you enter the sugar house during a normal year, you are immediately hit with a warm, wonderful steam from the evaporator as it boils down the sap in to maple syrup.  This year, however, everything still looks like this…

Frozen stream beside the West Minot Sugar House.
Frozen stream beside the West Minot Sugar House.

Slattery’s owner explained to visitors that for the sap to really run, you need a good string of 40 degree days.  That has not happened in any part of Maine yet this season.  As a result, a good number of sugar houses were not able to run the evaporators on this particular Maine Maple Sunday.  However, that did not stop them from serving up the golden goodness.

Slattery's owner next to the evaporator.
Slattery’s owner next to the evaporator.

In fact, on Maine Maple Sunday it is customary to drink maple syrup directly out of a cup.  You read that right.  Directly out of a cup.  Hey, I’ve been super clean diet sugar free for a long time now but you know what? I did it.  And I’d do it again.  Cheers!

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These are neither cold medicines nor medical samples. Think maple syrup. 😉

Of course, if you prefer your maple in solid form, there’s this…

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One of the truly charming things Slattery’s provides on Maine Maple Sunday is draft horse drawn wagon rides by Meadow Creek Farm.  I caught them just as they were putting Bill and Ben, the horses, in to the trailer.  They shook and rang their jingle bells while I was photographing them.  I love draft horses.

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As if it isn’t enough to provide food, maple products and education, and horse drawn carriage rides, this event also includes music.

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To view a short video of these guys playing “You Are My Sunshine,” click HERE.

This was a really wonderful event, and as I said, special thanks are in order to Pat Hutter, craft fair coordinator and member of the West Minot Grange, and to the Slattery family who worked so hard to make a lovely event (and kindly sent my husband upstairs with a free coffee for me).  Thanks also to everyone I met today, and especially those who sat down to give hooking a try for the very first time!  I would be remiss if I did not mention a little girl named Alex who sat down and pulled perfect loops on her first try.  And I mean perfect.

This is what community is all about.  That move we made to rural Maine was and continues to be so rewarding.  Please come up and visit some March for Maine Maple Sunday, and experience this day first hand.  Happy hooking! – Beth

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Painting of the West Minot Grange by Hester Gilpatric.